Will We Soon See A Sleeker Household LED?

Like CFLs when they first hit the mass market, household LEDs are still a rarity for your average table lamp or screw-in recessed fixture. Their upfront cost and unfamiliar appearance is partly to blame, but that may change thanks to a new LED bulb that’s been stripped of its heat sink.    

This design driven means of thermal management could help make LED lightbulbs a regular household fixture. Apart from streamlining the bulb’s appearance, removing the heat sink could also help shave some of the cost of the household LED– a critical factor in the household lighting industry. Once thought of as limited in terms of color and use, more and more homeowners are coming around to the benefits of LEDs. Right now, one of the biggest obstacles preventing their widespread use is cost, but all of that could change very soon– provided LED manufacturers keep innovating in the way they have.   


Do LED lights for home use impress? – YouTube

Do you think this new approach to LED thermal management will finally get LED bulbs in more homes? Tell us in the comments. 

7 thoughts on “Will We Soon See A Sleeker Household LED?

  1. Calvin says on November 11, 2014 at 12:24 pm

    I absolutely love LED bulbs mainly because they save energy, but especially because they produce far less heat than the old type of light bulb (It is not a stretch to call the old type of bulb obsolete because I think company’s stopped making the old type of bulb). This is important to me and anyone else who lives in tropical climates, particularly climates with lots of humidity. You won’t believe how much cooler a room can be with an LED bulb. This is the technology of the present and future.

  2. Harry says on November 12, 2014 at 4:30 pm

    Having a household LED would be great because they do tend to put out a lot more light. Do the LED’s have a longer life cycle as well when you are talking about energy saving? I am going to have to do some more research on these because this has me intrigued now. Keep up the good work this is going to go far in this post.

  3. Robert says on November 12, 2014 at 4:31 pm

    Having a household LED would be great because they do tend to put out a lot more light. Do the LED’s have a longer life cycle as well when you are talking about energy saving? I am going to have to do some more research on these because this has me intrigued now. Keep up the good work this is going to go far in this post.

  4. Herbert says on November 14, 2014 at 10:45 pm

    It seems to me that miniaturization and performance are creating a need for improved thermal management, driving significant market growth and technology shifts. I read that Thermal interface materials take off in smart phones and tablets. The smart phone and tablet thermal materials market will triple to more than $300 million in 2020. Given the sensitivity to weight and cost, these two end markets will rely on special thermal interface materials, rather than secondary heat sinks.

  5. Anthony says on November 14, 2014 at 11:15 pm

    I noticed that many of the bulbs sold are not lighting the room via LED. The LED blasts a phosphor with a harsh narrow spectrum of (fairly blue) radiation and then the phosphor re-radiates a broader spectrum. Partly this is because the phosphor radiates more broadly than an LED and partly this is because it enables all of the electricity-to-light conversion to be done by a blue LED. In any case, I prefer to buy LED bulbs.

  6. Gerald says on November 15, 2014 at 7:08 pm

    Fluorescent bulbs are more efficient, but their harsh color has prevented them from fully penetrating the lighting market. LEDs are long-lasting, extremely rugged – one scientist tells a tale of dropping one from three stories and then plugging it into a socket – and promise to be ten times more energy efficient than current incandescent lights. In addition, they remain at room temperature, which can cut down energy use even further by reducing air-conditioning that today offsets heat from lights. Color LEDs are already taking over the market in traffic lights, automotive tail lights, store signs and other specialty design applications. White LED lights, I am learning, with only six years of research behind them, remain prohibitively expensive for everyday home use in the US. Scientists have not yet created a white LED bulb that is energy-efficient and long-lasting enough to offset the cost of replacing the living-room incandescent.

  7. Edward says on November 15, 2014 at 11:13 pm

    I saw how Philips premiered what it describes as “the world’s first OLED-based interactive lighting concepts, which have been created for both consumer as well as professional use. The concepts are intuitive and interactive in use, and feature ultra flat shapes, soft light-effects and design possibilities “never before seen in lighting products. The result is lighting that goes beyond mere illumination – it becomes an experience in itself. What’s most interesting is that Philips presented four different luminaire concepts — standing, wall-mounted, desk-top and ceiling. All incorporate glowingly radiant flat OLED light panels, supplemented with Luxeon power LEDs for the functional lighting part. Each model has different intuitive interactive capabilities. The ceiling concept, for example, features a balance of up-light and down-light that can be changed or dimmed to alter the ambience in a room with a gesture of the hand. All of the concepts on show share a sleek, streamlined design that makes them as decorative as they are functional.

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